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grow at 4% asleep at the the right policies in place. my views will never fix the deficit soccer in the dirt. [applause] so therefore you shouldn't take my word for it. you should take the word for the people who are experts on the economy. and here's our product. you are the first to see it. so we published a book, "the 4% solution." jim is going to introduce many of the folks who are here who have written some of the chap verse. and then brendan miniter come in the very able editor at the bush summer will be conduct in the panel. if you please welcome jim glassman, founding executive director of the george w. bush institute and has led us nobly in her first 18 months of existence. for practice have you here. it's for coming. [applause] >> thank you, president bush. panelists may. president bush talk to you about what we are doing in africa. one of the waste to sum up what the bush institute does is advancing freedom. you can't be free if you're sick. he can't be free either if you live in a society ruled that the gators as the people of our brand or syria or cuba do. but the fr
in the current discussions about how to curb the federal deficits and avoid having us fling ourselves over the so-called fiscal cliff in a couple of weeks. we are trying to sort out the pluses and minuses of this proposal, which we find is more complicated than one might imagine, and it's complicated further by the shifting landscape of medicare policy, federal health policy, in light of the affordable care act, and the state of health care system generally. hence, today's program, and we're going to take a close look at some of the pros and cons with the help of some of the country's leading medicare and retirement policy analysts. we are pleased to have as a partner in today's program, a kaiser family foundation, leader in health policy analysis and health journalism and communication. we're especially happy to have as a co-moderator today, tricia neuman, whose the senior vice president of the foundation and a director of its program on medicare policy. and i have a quick note for you. if you are watching live on c-span, or for that matter watching the webcast, which will be available beginning
after that. the tax cut deal, big fights over the budget and the debt ceiling and deficit reduction and also the bin laden grade and reagan but happened in egypt and libya. so i'm looking at how obama made the decisions he made and why he took the actions he took in that very perilous time politically would also explain how this is all done in a way to set up the 2012 campaign that we just went through. he had a theory indy to do big hit in 2010, yet the theory that he could make the 2012 race a choice not just between him and mitt romney but a choice between different ideologies and different approaches to government and values. everything he did in that timeframe he kept trying to tether to this big idea. when i wrote the book of course we didn't know how things were going to end up on november 6, 2012. i looked at how he developed his governing strategy and electoral strategy and it really dominated. this is the back story to what happened with this presidential campaign. >> david corn, showdown is his most recent book and we are here at the national press club.
progress [inaudible] leading the way. but just as the u.k. deficit is not balanced with the government public transport issue are not solved in one year. we're public transport continued a national priority. we can't -- [inaudible] for the like of my young cousin. we can deliver more transport to get students from point a to point b. we can build a better, brighter future for young people. so when the opposition argument say it's not a national campaign, a focus of the divided region. i tell you this, divided we are weak, but united are the nation we are strong. more nation, one notion, one campaign. better public transport. [applause] [applause] >> thank you very much ib keyed for that. i note we have been joined by the former government chief when the labour party was in office nick browne. the member of parliament. it's great to have you here. thank you for coming. to oppose the motion, i call from the east of england. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. we are here for one reason. to make contain and empower the young people that we so proudly represent. but, -- the parliament ca
code, shrink the deficit, protect the taxpayers and grow the economy. but democrats consistently rejected those offers. the president chose instead to spend his time on the campaign trail. reelected. and congressional democrats sat on theirel hands. now republicans have bent over backwards. we stepped way, way out of our comfort zone. we wanted an agreement. w but we had no takers. but the phone never rang, and so now here we are five days from the new year, and we might finally start talking. democrats have had an entire year to put forward a balance withed, bipartisan proposal, and if they had something to fit the bilker i'm sure the majority maj leader would have been able toe deliver the votes the president would haveld needed to pass it here in the senate. and we wouldn't beth in this met but here we are, once again, at the end of the year staring at a crisis we shouldri have dealt wt literally months ago. make no mistake, the only reason democrats have been trying to deflect attention onto me and me colleagues over the past fewt weeks is that they don't have plan of their o
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5